Category: Daily News TD

New Medical Study sheds light on P. gingivalis colonization in a Human Brain as being the cause of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. The study also found that 100% of patients with Cardiovascular Disease had P. gingivalis arterial colonization.

Having Bad Breath could be a Major Risk Factor in developing Alzheimer’s Disease and Cardiovascular Disease.

A new Medical Study just released sheds light on P. gingivalis colonization in a human Brain as being the cause of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. The study also found that 100% of patients with Cardiovascular Disease had P. gingivalis arterial colonization.

The medical study is published by American Association for the Advancement of ScienceScience Advances. Click on this link to visit the Science Advances site to read the study titled “Porphyromonas gingivalis in Alzheimer’s disease brains: Evidence for disease causation and treatment with small-molecule inhibitors“.

The following are brief excerpts (you can read the full Study at the link noted above) from this new Research Study:

“The bacterium called gingipains (P. gingivalis) were identified in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients.”

Video is courtesy of OSH News Network YouTube Channel

Oral P. gingivalis infection in mice resulted in brain colonization and increased production of Aβ1–42, a component of amyloid plaques. Further, gingipains were neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, exerting detrimental effects on tau, a protein needed for normal neuronal function.”

“Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients exhibit neuroinflammation consistent with infection, including microglial activation, inflammasome activation, complement activation, and altered cytokine profiles (1, 2). Infectious agents have been found in the brain and postulated to be involved with AD, but robust evidence of causation has not been established (3).”

“In Apoe−/− mice, oral infection with P. gingivalis, but not with two other oral bacteria, results in brain infection and activation of the complement pathway (14). In transgenic mice overexpressing mutated human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP-J20), oral infection with P. gingivalis impairs cognitive function, increases the deposition of AD-like plaques, and results in alveolar bone loss compared to control hAPP-J20 mice (15). P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide has been detected in human AD brains (16), promoting the hypothesis that P. gingivalis infection of the brain plays a role in AD pathogenesis (17).”

“P. gingivalis is mainly found during gingival and periodontal infections; however, it can also be found at low levels in 25% of healthy individuals with no oral disease (18). Transient bacteremia of P. gingivalis can occur during common activities such as brushing, flossing, and chewing, as well as during dental procedures (19), resulting in documented translocation to a variety of tissues including coronary arteries (20), placenta (21), and liver (22).”

“A recent study found that 100% of patients with cardiovascular disease had P. gingivalis arterial colonization.” (23).

Video is courtesy of John Douillard YouTube Channel

Click on this link to visit the New Scientist website to reqd their article titled “We may finally know what causes Alzheimer’s – and how to stop it“.

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