Category: Christopher D. Watkins

New Medical Study: “Creating beauty: Creativity compensates for low physical attractiveness when individuals assess the attractiveness of social and romantic partners” by Christopher D. Watkins

If you are a lucky male who was born incredibly handsome, you may want to skip this discussion of a new Scientific Study. On the other hand, if you are an average or below average looking male, this new Study titled: “Creating beauty: Creativity compensates for low physical attractiveness when individuals assess the attractiveness of social and romantic partners” by Christopher D. Watkins of Abertay University in Scotland may just help shed light on ways to improve your romantic life or maybe even get one.

I run this blog and shoot photographs of events such as shows and concerts. I do it for the fun of it. Today I learned that there are other benefits to being “creative” and displaying your creativity. My creativity will compensate for my “not being” a total male hunk and  Eye Candy in a woman’s eyes.  That’s not to say that I’m ugly, just average looking. Ask any guy if they would prefer a beautiful girlfriend or one which looks just average. Surprise, the same goes for women. Humans prefer beauty in their partners. It is instinctive and meant to help continue with the survival of the human species.

This newly published Research Study conducted by Christopher Watkins of Abertay University in Scotland helps to explain some of the extremely gorgeous women that I have dated in my life. The downside of dating a really great looking woman is that any other guys in the same room will be doing body scans of your girlfriend.

So how is that a physically gorgeous female super model would even go out with an average looking guy like me?

This new scientific study

Unfortunately, this does not apply to women. Displays of creativity by an average looking women, will not enhance her appeal to the eyes of a male. Us males are rather fixated on physical beauty. Your average looking female can have tons of “inner beauty” and in the end that is far more important. But males generally look at the outer packaging.

Click on this link to download a PDF copy of the published Research Study titled “Creating beauty: Creativity compensates for low physical attractiveness when individuals assess the attractiveness of social and romantic partners” by Christopher D. Watkins

Enough of Vince’s banter, I know that the readers here can’t wait to view this new Research Study, which is below. Please note that I am posting this new research with permission, but that does not mean that Christopher D. Watkins  or Abertay University in Scotland in any way endorse the Uniquely Toronto website or Vincent Banial.

Creating beauty: creativity compensates for low physical attractiveness when individuals assess the attractiveness of social and romantic partners

Christopher D. Watkins

Abstract

Although creativity is attractive in a potential mate, it is unclear (i) whether the effects of creativity on attractiveness generalize to other social contexts and (ii) whether creativity has equivalent effects on men’s and women’s attractiveness. As social knowledge of creativity may either enhance or ‘offset’ the appeal of social partners who differ in physical attractiveness, three repeated measures experiments were conducted to directly address these issues. Here, participants rated a series of face–text pairs for attractiveness on trials that differed in one of four combinations of facial attractiveness (attractive and less attractive) and creativity (creative and less creative), rating story-tellers in two experiments (short interpretations of an identical painting) and creative ideas in a further experiment (alternative uses for an everyday object). Regardless of the sex of the judge, creativity and facial attractiveness had independent effects on men’s overall attractiveness (initial experiment) and, in further experiments, more substantial effects on the attractiveness of men with less attractive faces than men with attractive faces (when using a different measure of creativity) and specific effects on the attractiveness of individuals with less attractive faces (when using different face stimuli). Collectively, across three experiments, these findings suggest that creativity may compensate for putative cues to lower biological ‘quality’ and that the benefits of creativity to social groups more generally enhance attraction to creative men (in two experiments) and creative men and women (one experiment). More broadly, the data suggest that species can integrate knowledge of cognitive intelligence with visual cues to biological ‘quality’ to facilitate mate and/or ally choice.

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