Landmark study: Enterobacter cloacae B29, may causatively contribute to the development of Obesity & Insulin Resistance

 

Rough and smooth colony growth of Enterobacter...

Rough and smooth colony growth of Enterobacter cloacae bacteria on Tryptic Soy Broth agar. Obtained from the CDC Public Health Image Library. Image credit: CDC(PHIL #6552), 1983. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gut microbiota may causatively contribute to the development of Obesity & Insulin Resistance. More work needs to be done in this important research area.

The new study is titled: An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice.

The study was authored by  Na Fei and Liping Zhao of State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism and School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Liping Zhao is also associated with Shanghai Centre for Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.

To visit the ISME Journal page featuring this study, plse click on the following link:

ISME Journal page with the Study titled: An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice

The study was released under the Creative Commons License.Creative Commons License site

You might also be interested in another post related to Obesity research. That post was about findings published in the journal Cell Metabolism (Feb 2013). That post was titled: “Ottawa based researchers find microRNA-133 could play a regulator role in fighting Human Obesity”. You can read the post by clicking on the following link: ccvic.zenfolio.com post on microRNA-133.

Disclaimer:

Any trademarks or brands mentioned are the property of their respective owners. Neither ISME Journal, nor the Authors of this study (Na Fei and Liping Zhao) are affiliated with this blog, nor do they  endorse it.

I have tried to comply with the requirements of the Creative Commons license. If a mistake was made please let me know by email or comment and I will work to quickly correct. I believe this study to be incredibly important. As such I had hoped that posting about it on this blog could help the study garner more attention.

Everything in this blog post is subject to change without notice.

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One comment

  1. Pingback: Intestinal microbiota metabolism producing Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO), may be a contributing factor in developing Cardiovascular Disease in Humans. Very important study just published in Nature Medicine. | Uniquely Toronto